A market where Bitcoin gets actively traded with other value-carrying assets is, in simple words, a Bitcoin market. It is like any other Forex bazaar where one buys a currency with another. But unlike fiat currencies, which are minted under the confidence of nations’ economic and financial status, Bitcoin is created without keeping such influential factors in mind. The digital currency is simply generated through a process called “mining”, where miners concurrently solve a block of 50 BTC through mathematical computations. The minted Bitcoins are either stored or are further sold to the regulated exchanges or individuals for fiat money.
Bitcoin was developed through technology that executes completely online. It is stored virtually, on wallets or exchanges. Everything is online and one can remotely transfer and send value to anyone online (stored in bitcoin as a currency). One can’t touch their bitcoins the same way one can touch physical things such as a dollar bill, computer desk, a tree etc.

Another issue is the way individuals trade currencies. In addition to the one-to-one trading potential, currency traders can boost their leverage through derivatives and other paper contracts designed to boost returns. In the current environment, some brokers are slowly underwriting contracts that will boost leverage in the bitcoin sector, but such contracts are still in their infancy. Bitcoin trading is more similar to the ownership of an equity on the New York Stock Exchange. Like shares of Exxon Mobil Corporation (XOM), bitcoin is subject to price swings and market volatility.
Illiquidity. This is mostly moot due to Bitcoin’s $47 market cap but it still makes users sweat. It’s highly unlikely that Bitcoin’s price would plummet and you’d be unable to take action, but it’s still unsettling.  As more investors invest, however, illiquidity becomes a negligible risk, as there will likely always be a buyer for Bitcoins waiting.
While it’s very easy to buy Bitcoins - there are numerous exchanges in existence that trade in BTC - other cryptocurrencies aren’t as easy to acquire. Although, this situation is slowly improving with major exchanges like Kraken, BitFinex, BitStamp and many others starting to sell Litecoin, Ethereum, Monero, Ripple and so on. There are also a few other different ways of being coin, for instance, you can trade face-to-face with a seller or use a Bitcoin ATM.
It’s a tough question in my opinion. Each will have an upside compared to others. Check a few out and look up on forums to see what users are saying about the service provided, and which they think are the best Crypto Exchanges to buy bitcoin easily. Localbitcoins.com is a really cool crypto exchange p2p bitcoin exchange for beginners wanting to buy for their first time. The service is all over the world, meaning you can use euros, pounds, yen, australian dollars, swiss francs, canadian dollars, krona, rubles, lira, rupees and so on. If you pay by physical cash then you get to meet the person in real life. Alternatively you can do a fast bank transfer and the site will hold your coins in escrow for you once it goes through. Obviously there are more simple ways to start using a crypto exchnages and bitcoin exchange and buy altcoins. Some like to buy with paypal, but not many leading bitcoin exchanges accept this because of chargebacks.
Speculation drives numbers. Many Bitcoin users are holding onto their bitcoins in hopes of selling them off for an enormous profit one day. With news articles portraying Bitcoin millionaires as lucky kids who got in early, you can’t really blame them. For example, if you had spent your $5 latte money on 2,000 bitcoins one morning in 2010, they would be worth about $5.4 million today. Makes you really wish you’d managed your Starbucks budget better, doesn’t it?
Another factor that sends shivers down the Bitcoin industry is constant attempts to hack the Bitcoin exchanges’ hot wallets. The curious case of Mt.Gox has been the biggest example, where a $450 million worth of Bitcoin amount was stolen. Later on, many other exchanges became victim to the similar thefts, including BitStamp , BitFinex and many others.

In March 2013 the blockchain temporarily split into two independent chains with different rules. The two blockchains operated simultaneously for six hours, each with its own version of the transaction history. Normal operation was restored when the majority of the network downgraded to version 0.7 of the bitcoin software.[37] The Mt. Gox exchange briefly halted bitcoin deposits and the price dropped by 23% to $37[38][39] before recovering to previous level of approximately $48 in the following hours.[40] The US Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN) established regulatory guidelines for "decentralized virtual currencies" such as bitcoin, classifying American bitcoin miners who sell their generated bitcoins as Money Service Businesses (MSBs), that are subject to registration or other legal obligations.[41][42][43] In April, exchanges BitInstant and Mt. Gox experienced processing delays due to insufficient capacity[44] resulting in the bitcoin price dropping from $266 to $76 before returning to $160 within six hours.[45] The bitcoin price rose to $259 on 10 April, but then crashed by 83% to $45 over the next three days.[35] On 15 May 2013, US authorities seized accounts associated with Mt. Gox after discovering it had not registered as a money transmitter with FinCEN in the US.[46][47] On 23 June 2013, the US Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) listed 11.02 bitcoins as a seized asset in a United States Department of Justice seizure notice pursuant to 21 U.S.C. § 881.[48] This marked the first time a government agency had seized bitcoin.[49][50] The FBI seized about 26,000 bitcoins in October 2013 from the dark web website Silk Road during the arrest of Ross William Ulbricht.[51][52][53] Bitcoin's price rose to $755 on 19 November and crashed by 50% to $378 the same day. On 30 November 2013 the price reached $1,163 before starting a long-term crash, declining by 87% to $152 in January 2015.[35] On 5 December 2013, the People's Bank of China prohibited Chinese financial institutions from using bitcoins.[54] After the announcement, the value of bitcoins dropped,[55] and Baidu no longer accepted bitcoins for certain services.[56] Buying real-world goods with any virtual currency had been illegal in China since at least 2009.[57]
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