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No one knows who the real owners behind btc-e are. Apparently the headquarters of the company are in Bulgaria and the support staff is more familiar with Russian then with English, but the rest is a mystery. The company operates a complicated deposit and withdrawal process that relays the money through several banks and payment processors before depositing them to your account. If you plan to deposit on BTC-E, make sure to follow their deposit instructions to the letter. Because the deposits go through a web of banks, tracking down a lost deposit is near to impossible.
The price of bitcoins has gone through cycles of appreciation and depreciation referred to by some as bubbles and busts.[156] In 2011, the value of one bitcoin rapidly rose from about US$0.30 to US$32 before returning to US$2.[157] In the latter half of 2012 and during the 2012–13 Cypriot financial crisis, the bitcoin price began to rise,[158] reaching a high of US$266 on 10 April 2013, before crashing to around US$50.[159] On 29 November 2013, the cost of one bitcoin rose to a peak of US$1,242.[160] In 2014, the price fell sharply, and as of April remained depressed at little more than half 2013 prices. As of August 2014 it was under US$600.[161] During their time as bitcoin developers, Gavin Andresen[162] and Mike Hearn[163] warned that bubbles may occur.
Legal Gray Area. Major governments have largely remained on the sidelines, and this has created both a sense of potential and apprehension for Bitcoin proponents and critics respectively. Bitcoin isn’t backed by a regulatory agency and a government would technically be ceding power by supporting a decentralized currency. This has been largely officially unaddressed. Bitcoin’s price, however, tends to be very sensitive to any news concerning the US government’s opinion of cryptocurrencies. For example, when the SEC denied the approval of bitcoin-based exchange-traded-products—essentially bitcoin-backed assets on the stock market—in 2017, Bitcoin’s price dropped 18%. Yet while the price and adoption of Bitcoin would be affected by government action, governments are unable to criminalize Bitcoin. In fact, governments such as the United States and China have invested in it at some capacity.
My question has always been where do you put your coins when selling? If I sell a token it automatically goes to Bitcoin … but you’re still exposed to crypto volatility. To sell that Bitcoin and transfer it back to my bank just doesn’t make sense. Is there a way to leave it as dollars somewhere? Also, is there offline storage for all the other misc tokens?
As a cryptocurrency, Bitcoin is generated through the process of "mining"—essentially using your computer's processing power to solve complex algorithms called "blocks." You earn around 50 Bitcoins once a block has been decrypted. The catch? Depending on how powerful your CPU is, solving a single block can take a year or more. Another means of obtaining Bitcoin is to simply buy it, exchanging physical currency for digital at a Bitcoin exchange like Mt. Gox or Bitstamp, or through a service like BitInstant.
Bitcoin prices were negatively affected by several hacks or thefts from cryptocurrency exchanges, including thefts from Coincheck in January 2018, Coinrail and Bithumb in June, and Bancor in July. For the first six months of 2018, $761 million worth of cryptocurrencies was reported stolen from exchanges.[61] Bitcoin's price was affected even though other cryptocurrencies were stolen at Coinrail and Bancor, as investors worried about the security of cryptocurrency exchanges.[62][63][64]
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