Bitcoin is pseudonymous rather than anonymous in that the cryptocurrency within a wallet is not tied to people, but rather to one or more specific keys (or "addresses").[41] Thereby, bitcoin owners are not identifiable, but all transactions are publicly available in the blockchain.[41] Still, cryptocurrency exchanges are often required by law to collect the personal information of their users.[41]
Third-party internet services called online wallets offer similar functionality but may be easier to use. In this case, credentials to access funds are stored with the online wallet provider rather than on the user's hardware.[94][95] As a result, the user must have complete trust in the wallet provider. A malicious provider or a breach in server security may cause entrusted bitcoins to be stolen. An example of such a security breach occurred with Mt. Gox in 2011.[96] This has led to the often-repeated meme "Not your keys, not your bitcoin".[97]
The listing of BAT and ZRX by Coinbase confirmed that the two tokens are not considered securities under existing regulations set forth by local financial authorities in the US. Coinbase was cautious in listing tokens on its platform because in an event wherein the tokens listed by the exchange are identified as securities, Coinbase could be targeted by the US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) for the distribution of unregistered securities.
Popular exchange Bitfinex has similar instructions and lets you trade BTC for Ethereum, Litecoin and Bitcoin Cash. It actually offers far more cryptocurrencies to trade for - dozens of them, in fact. Bitfinex also offers several more options for your orders, such as OCO, aka One Cancels Other - placing a pair of orders with the understanding that if one order is completed the other is immediately canceled. Gemini and Poloniex are two other fairly prominent bitcoin exchanges that let you trade for ethereum, while Kraken also offers Dash and Ripple. Trade fees vary from exchange to exchange.
Decentralized cryptocurrency is produced by the entire cryptocurrency system collectively, at a rate which is defined when the system is created and which is publicly known. In centralized banking and economic systems such as the Federal Reserve System, corporate boards or governments control the supply of currency by printing units of fiat money or demanding additions to digital banking ledgers. In case of decentralized cryptocurrency, companies or governments cannot produce new units, and have not so far provided backing for other firms, banks or corporate entities which hold asset value measured in it. The underlying technical system upon which decentralized cryptocurrencies are based was created by the group or individual known as Satoshi Nakamoto.[23]
Transactions are verified by network nodes through cryptography and recorded in a public distributed ledger called a blockchain. Bitcoin was invented by an unknown person or group of people using the name Satoshi Nakamoto[9] and released as open-source software in 2009.[10] Bitcoins are created as a reward for a process known as mining. They can be exchanged for other currencies,[11] products, and services. Research produced by the University of Cambridge estimates that in 2017, there were 2.9 to 5.8 million unique users using a cryptocurrency wallet, most of them using bitcoin.[12]
×