Various journalists,[205][212] economists,[213][214] and the central bank of Estonia[215] have voiced concerns that bitcoin is a Ponzi scheme. In 2013, Eric Posner, a law professor at the University of Chicago, stated that "a real Ponzi scheme takes fraud; bitcoin, by contrast, seems more like a collective delusion."[216] A 2014 report by the World Bank concluded that bitcoin was not a deliberate Ponzi scheme.[217]:7 The Swiss Federal Council[218]:21 examined the concerns that bitcoin might be a pyramid scheme; it concluded that, "Since in the case of bitcoin the typical promises of profits are lacking, it cannot be assumed that bitcoin is a pyramid scheme." In July 2017, billionaire Howard Marks referred to bitcoin as a pyramid scheme.[219]
So, let’s put everything on the table. ICOs are essentially coins which you get by supplying someone with currently successful crypto coins so that they have a chance to make new future proof and even more successful coins. It seems silly, but somehow these ICO transactions are actually making a huge buzz in the cryptocurrency world. It is estimated that nearly $240 million has already been invested into such ICOs, of which about $110 million was invested this year. Surely there is a reason for such a huge movement of money? We think that people are constantly searching for that new and shiny cryptocurrency that will inevitably become the world currency system, and perhaps this is the reason why investments into this research are so high. Some of you might say that the potential is already there via Bitcoin or some other already released currency, but the reality is that not everyone is on the same page. Those of us who are so called non-conformists might be looking for something special in other places.
Legal Gray Area. Major governments have largely remained on the sidelines, and this has created both a sense of potential and apprehension for Bitcoin proponents and critics respectively. Bitcoin isn’t backed by a regulatory agency and a government would technically be ceding power by supporting a decentralized currency. This has been largely officially unaddressed. Bitcoin’s price, however, tends to be very sensitive to any news concerning the US government’s opinion of cryptocurrencies. For example, when the SEC denied the approval of bitcoin-based exchange-traded-products—essentially bitcoin-backed assets on the stock market—in 2017, Bitcoin’s price dropped 18%. Yet while the price and adoption of Bitcoin would be affected by government action, governments are unable to criminalize Bitcoin. In fact, governments such as the United States and China have invested in it at some capacity.
The third biggest fundamental driver of bitcoin prices is the increased (or decreased) usage in activities outlawed by governments. Bitcoin’s pseudo anonymity has facilitated dealings in anything from the purchase of contraband like illegal drugs or weapons to bypassing capital and investment restrictions and tax avoidance. Government crackdown on these activities tends to suppress the price of bitcoin.
The idea behind the blockchain comes with two main principals. The first is easy to understand, make all the transactions public thus allowing complete transparency over all transactions and the ability to cross reference or double check each transaction if necessary. The second principal is somewhat more unique and isn’t realized by others. Recording each transaction in a public ledger also prevents this information from being duplicated. This way every transaction is unique in its own way, which successfully eliminates transaction fraud and other financial crimes. Oh, did we mention that verification of each transaction are done by other users on the Bitcoin network, and this can’t be compromised or corrupted by anything or anyone? Yep, it truly is that secure.
To realize digital cash you need a payment network with accounts, balances, and transaction. That‘s easy to understand. One major problem every payment network has to solve is to prevent the so-called double spending: to prevent that one entity spends the same amount twice. Usually, this is done by a central server who keeps record about the balances.
The cryptocurrencies are a solution to many of the obstacles that the traditional financial system currently has, sending money to different parts of the world is expensive, sometimes delayed and in some places it is not possible to do so. We are in a globalized era and cryptocurrencies help make financial transactions fast, secure and low cost. There are projects with a great vision, for example, the cryptocurrency Ultrapoint has the mission to become the first currency for global and practical use in all sectors of the economy. Then when a cryptocurrency achieves massive use, then its benefits will be fully understood.

Cryptocurrencies have been compared to Ponzi schemes, pyramid schemes[77] and economic bubbles,[78] such as housing market bubbles.[79] Howard Marks of Oaktree Capital Management stated in 2017 that digital currencies were "nothing but an unfounded fad (or perhaps even a pyramid scheme), based on a willingness to ascribe value to something that has little or none beyond what people will pay for it", and compared them to the tulip mania (1637), South Sea Bubble (1720), and dot-com bubble (1999).[80]
A BTC wallet is like a real wallet filled with cash. You should never keep all your eggs in one basket and the BTC wallet is no different from this age old idiom. So far there is no air tight solution to keeping your BTC safe and secured...the following action items that can help protect your BTC investment: Backup and encrypt your wallet, make multiple copies of your backup, store them in more than one secure location and finally, don't keep all your BTCs in one wallet.

Satoshi's anonymity often raises unjustified concerns because of a misunderstanding of Bitcoin's open-source nature. Everyone has access to all of the source code all of the time and any developer can review or modify the software code. As such, the identity of Bitcoin's inventor is probably as relevant today as the identity of the person who invented paper.

Thanks for the basic info. Which is very relevant. I am a day trader and a swing trader. I love how the markets keep you grounded as if you start to get cocky you will start to loose. I find trading a great way to earn an income. How ever it is a skill that takes time to learn. Some tips I feel need to be added to people starting out are. 1, never put all your eggs in 1 basket. So only put a percentage of your account on a trade. 2 start out small. If you decide to… Read more »


Regulation. It's the only way to bring the BTC markets under control, push out the criminal element, and make them safe for commercial interests to enter. While some investors see the upcoming regulatory crackdown as a death knell of the Bitcoin, it should actually do the opposite and finally reign in the currency's wild value fluctuations. Just as the crash of the poorly monitored sub-prime mortgage market led to the Great Recession, allowing the Wild West days of Bitcoin trading to continue will only lead to more and bigger crashes.


On 24 August 2017 (at block 481,824), Segregated Witness (SegWit) went live. Transactions contain some data which is only used to verify the transaction, and does not otherwise effect the movement of coins. SegWit introduced a new transaction format that moved this data into a new field in a backwards-compatible way. The segregated data, the so-called witness, is not sent to non-SegWit nodes and therefore does not form part of the blockchain as seen by legacy nodes. This lowers the size of the average transaction in such nodes' view, thereby increasing the block size without incurring the hard fork implied by other proposals for block size increases. Thus, per computer scientist Jochen Hoenicke, the actual block capacity depends on the ratio of SegWit transactions in the block, and on the ratio of signature data. Based on his estimate, if the ratio of SegWit transactions is 50%, the block capacity may be 1.25 megabytes. According to Hoenicke, if native SegWit addresses from Bitcoin Core version 0.16.0 are used, and SegWit adoption reaches 90% to 95%, a block size of up to 1.8 megabytes is possible.[citation needed]
If you decide to invest in cryptocurrencies, Bitcoin is obviously still the dominant one. However, in 2017 its share in the crypto-market has quite dramatically fallen from 90 percent to just 40 percent. There are many options currently available, with some coins being privacy-focused, others being less open and decentralized than Bitcoin and some just outright copying it.
Please note that virtual currency is a digital representation of value that functions as a medium of exchange, a unit of account, or a store of value, but it does not have legal tender status. Virtual currencies are sometimes exchanged for U.S. dollars or other currencies around the world, but they are not currently backed nor supported by any government or central bank. Their value is completely derived by market forces of supply and demand, and they are more volatile than traditional fiat currencies. Profits and losses related to this volatility are amplified in margined futures contracts.
Cryptocurrencies' blockchains are secure, but other aspects of a cryptocurrency ecosystem are not immune to the threat of hacking. In Bitcoin's almost 10-year history, several online exchanges have been the subject of hacking and theft, sometimes with millions of dollars worth of 'coins' stolen. Still, many observers look at cryptocurrencies as hope that a currency can exist that preserves value, facilitates exchange, is more transportable than hard metals, and is outside the influence of central banks and governments.
The first cryptocurrency to capture the public imagination was Bitcoin, which was launched in 2009 by an individual or group known under the pseudonym, Satoshi Nakamoto. As of October 2018, there were over 17.33 million bitcoins in circulation with a total market value of around $115 billion (although the market price of bitcoin can fluctuate quite a bit). Bitcoin's success has spawned a number of competing cryptocurrencies, known as "altcoins" such as Litecoin, Namecoin and Peercoin, as well as Ethereum, EOS, and Cardano. Today, there are literally thousands of cryptocurrencies in existence, with an aggregate market value of over $200 billion (Bitcoin currently represents more than 50% of the total value).
The level of security among pools also varies greatly, from simply requiring a BTC username to requiring a 2-Step Google Authenticator code before paying out. Luckily, given the anonymous nature of Bitcoin, you generally won't have to include any personable, stealable, information. Still, money and complete strangers can be a particularly combustible situation.
Illiquidity. This is mostly moot due to Bitcoin’s $47 market cap but it still makes users sweat. It’s highly unlikely that Bitcoin’s price would plummet and you’d be unable to take action, but it’s still unsettling.  As more investors invest, however, illiquidity becomes a negligible risk, as there will likely always be a buyer for Bitcoins waiting.

Most cryptocurrencies are designed to gradually decrease production of that currency, placing a cap on the total amount of that currency that will ever be in circulation.[25] Compared with ordinary currencies held by financial institutions or kept as cash on hand, cryptocurrencies can be more difficult for seizure by law enforcement.[1] This difficulty is derived from leveraging cryptographic technologies.

It's been sad to watch crypto suffer as much as it has this year, and the worst part is it appears nobody has learned much of anything. Once cryptos usefulness as an endless speculation casino finally dries up (it's getting there), these worthless projects will be all that remains, eternally debating the next hardfork because this developer disagrees over some petty nonsense with another.

Paul Krugman, Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences winner does not like bitcoin, has repeated numerous times that it is a bubble that will not last[92] and links it to Tulip mania.[93] American business magnate Warren Buffett thinks that cryptocurrency will come to a bad ending.[94] In October 2017, BlackRock CEO Laurence D. Fink called bitcoin an 'index of money laundering'.[95] "Bitcoin just shows you how much demand for money laundering there is in the world," he said.
Legal Gray Area. Major governments have largely remained on the sidelines, and this has created both a sense of potential and apprehension for Bitcoin proponents and critics respectively. Bitcoin isn’t backed by a regulatory agency and a government would technically be ceding power by supporting a decentralized currency. This has been largely officially unaddressed. Bitcoin’s price, however, tends to be very sensitive to any news concerning the US government’s opinion of cryptocurrencies. For example, when the SEC denied the approval of bitcoin-based exchange-traded-products—essentially bitcoin-backed assets on the stock market—in 2017, Bitcoin’s price dropped 18%. Yet while the price and adoption of Bitcoin would be affected by government action, governments are unable to criminalize Bitcoin. In fact, governments such as the United States and China have invested in it at some capacity.

The listing of BAT and ZRX by Coinbase confirmed that the two tokens are not considered securities under existing regulations set forth by local financial authorities in the US. Coinbase was cautious in listing tokens on its platform because in an event wherein the tokens listed by the exchange are identified as securities, Coinbase could be targeted by the US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) for the distribution of unregistered securities.

The growing popularity of bitcoin as an alternative investment has drawn the attention of forex brokers who are looking to expand their offerings. Some define bitcoin as a traditional currency, especially since the trading of bitcoins is not based on macroeconomics of a nation, but instead the underlying platform and broader reaction to shifts in global economics.
After a certain amount of transactions have been verified by a miner, they will receive newly minted bitcoins for their work and thus new bitcoins will be added into circulation, while the number of bitcoins in circulations are now in the multi-millions range, the maximum amount of  bitcoins that can ever be created is capped at 21 million. The creation rate is automatically halved every few years as more bitcoins are added into circulation, whilst this system is modeled after gold, mining difficulty is always increasing and makes finding new bitcoins more rare as the number of available bitcoins reaches the 21 million cap.

Before you can make money day trading bitcoin you’ll need some capital to start with. The internet is packed full of warnings about losing all your money so let’s keep this brief. Whilst you find your feet, using a small amount is advisable. It’s also worth highlighting that you should never trade more than you’re willing to lose. Be strict and regimented with what you can and can’t afford to lose, and you’ll never need to worry about losing out to the cryptocurrency market.

Bitcoin was developed through technology that executes completely online. It is stored virtually, on wallets or exchanges. Everything is online and one can remotely transfer and send value to anyone online (stored in bitcoin as a currency). One can’t touch their bitcoins the same way one can touch physical things such as a dollar bill, computer desk, a tree etc.
“While it’s still fairly new and unstable relative to the gold standard, cryptocurrency is definitely gaining traction and will most certainly have more normalized uses in the next few years. Right now, in particular, it’s increasing in popularity with the post-election market uncertainty. The key will be in making it easy for large-scale adoption (as with anything involving crypto) including developing safeguards and protections for buyers/investors. I expect that within two years, we’ll be in a place where people can shove their money under the virtual mattress through cryptocurrency, and they’ll know that wherever they go, that money will be there.” – Sarah Granger, Author, and Speaker. 
It is interesting to note that a major bitcoin rally started right after the Silk Road shutdown, somewhat dispelling critics arguments that the virtual currency was mainly used as a tool for facilitating drug trafficking. In the months following the site’s closure, several major online and offline businesses started accepting bitcoins. These include major US retailers like Overstock.com and Tiger Direct. The CEO of Overstock.com reported that the company logged more than 800 purchases using Bitcoin on the first day they started offering the new payment solution, totalling $130,000. The company estimates that Bitcoin buyers have made $500,000 in purchases in the first 14 days since the new payment option was offered.

Sadly, with the demise of Cryptsy there is a need for a new major first-rate cryptocurrency and Bitcoin exchange (aka altcoins). Having many medium-sized cryptocurrency exchange bitcoin sites is a better situation than having one large amazing option. Bittrex (new account creation temporarily disabled) has now replaced Poloniex as the largest most amazing option to exchange bitcoin. Its platform is functional enough to have attracted tens of millions of new customer every month. Things feel smooth when using Bittrex. All big and small trading pairs are offered and it is now possible to do cryptocurrency margin trading on major altcoins. This is a cool feature, but use it with caution as leveraged trading has a certain risk factor. Keep in mind that some of the best bitcoin exchange sites also do altcoins. Yobit, Bittrex, Cryptopia and Changelly, are great options worth checking out. Some even offer short selling on major coins.


How does the flow of Cryptocurrency handled? How is the ratio between supply and demand balanced? I have read that there has been times when the security of crypto-network has been compromised. Is it really the future of Digital Money? Rather than a currency, it seems to be an investment scheme plan. I am not trying to be a critic here, just a lot of questions bubbling into the mind.
Nakamoto is estimated to have mined one million bitcoins[27] before disappearing in 2010, when he handed the network alert key and control of the code repository over to Gavin Andresen. Andresen later became lead developer at the Bitcoin Foundation.[28][29] Andresen then sought to decentralize control. This left opportunity for controversy to develop over the future development path of bitcoin.[30][29]
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